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History

Plas Dinas is Grade II listed and dates back to the mid-seventeenth century but with extensive Victorian additions.  The original house was build around the substantial stone arched fireplace which can still be seen in the Gun Room today.

 

The house, surrounded by farmland, came into the possession of the Armstrong-Jones family in the nineteenth century through marriage.  In 1899 Sir Robert Jones, who subsequently altered his name to Armstrong-Jones, had a son named Ronald.  The family was, at that time, living in the London area and retained Plas Dinas as their country home.

 

Ronald Jones married Anne, and the marriage produced a son, Antony, who in 1961 married HRH Princess Margaret, the Queen’s sister.  Lord Snowdon, who suffered a major attack of polio in his youth built a reputation for photography and has portrayed many famous people in his career, including members of the current House of Windsor.

 

In 1963, he was appointed to the post of Constable of Caernarfon Castle and when the young Prince Charles became Prince of Wales, he was largely responsible for organising the investiture ceremony in the castle.  Princess Margaret regularly spent weekends at Plas Dinas during this period in their marriage.

 

 

In the 1980s, the house, now owned by Peregrine Armstrong-Jones, Lord Snowdon’s half-brother, was leased out as a grand nursing home, which was then converted into a hotel in the early 1990s.

 

Plas Dinas still retains many family portraits, memorabilia and original furniture.  It presents the opportunity to enjoy the ambience of a genuine Welsh gentleman’s country residence, largely unspoilt by its conversion to luxury accommodation.